BoyMeetsMill

This is my story told through my photos, my projects, and adventures.

This was one of the first images from my first roll through the my new Holga 120WPC pinhole camera. Still a relative new guy to the film world, Heck! Still a new guy to photography. I was intrigued by pinholes basic construction, simplicity, and ability to create detailed images that hint of dreamy soft images.
This particular day I was off on adventure to the hot springs. A couple of friends and I hopped into a low clearance import and set off. The chances of us making it was slim and we knew it. But in our favor us was nothing else to do with a day off and a case of cheap beer. We set off at the crack of noon and drove along the river gawking at the freshly fallen snow. Only 3 miles from the hot springs the build up of snow and ice was too much for the small compact. The car could go no further. It had wedged itself on the build up of snow the fender had been plowing for the last couple miles. Add bald tires to the scenario and it was in agreement that the hot springs were no longer on today’s agenda. We unstuck the car, turned it around, parked it, popped the hatchback, cracked a beer, and took in the view.
We get snow occasionally in Portland, but only dustings which soon become littered with tracks and then tainted brown when it starts to melt. This place was untouched. Absent of trees meadows became features white lakes. The build up of snow made absorbs a substantial amount of noise. With most of the wild life hibernating or migrating the forest becomes almost eerily quiet.
After a couple of swigs of beer, and a couple of thrown snowballs I set off with my pinholga. Freshly loaded with Fuji Across I walked back 20 yards to a band in the river. The snow was deep enough to swallow my gorilla pod. I composed as best as I could with no viewfinder only a couple of sight lines and the spirit level on the Holga. It was so bright the exposure was only a couple of seconds. Picked up my camera and my beer off to another stop on the way back home.
On the way back I finished this roll of film. With negatives 6x12 you only get 6 exposures. Still new to working with any kind of Holga I didn’t have a proper spool tensioning strategy. Or even realize to check to tighten the roll when removing it from the camera. The loosely wound roll caused light leaks in 4 of the 6 images. Thankfully this one came out unharmed.
Last month I submitted this image to the Plates to Pixels call of art. The show titled “LenZless” is about making images with cameras that don’t have lenses. Some of the images selected they went beyond the pinhole camera, and made some very unique and interesting images. This image “Snowy River Bend” was chosen for the exhibit hosted on Plates to Pixels website and in the exhibits printed catalog. You can check out my image and all the others at the link below.
Plates to Pixels: LenZless
Thank you to Zeb Andrews, Blue Mitchell, and Plates to Pixels.

This was one of the first images from my first roll through the my new Holga 120WPC pinhole camera. Still a relative new guy to the film world, Heck! Still a new guy to photography. I was intrigued by pinholes basic construction, simplicity, and ability to create detailed images that hint of dreamy soft images.

This particular day I was off on adventure to the hot springs. A couple of friends and I hopped into a low clearance import and set off. The chances of us making it was slim and we knew it. But in our favor us was nothing else to do with a day off and a case of cheap beer. We set off at the crack of noon and drove along the river gawking at the freshly fallen snow. Only 3 miles from the hot springs the build up of snow and ice was too much for the small compact. The car could go no further. It had wedged itself on the build up of snow the fender had been plowing for the last couple miles. Add bald tires to the scenario and it was in agreement that the hot springs were no longer on today’s agenda. We unstuck the car, turned it around, parked it, popped the hatchback, cracked a beer, and took in the view.

We get snow occasionally in Portland, but only dustings which soon become littered with tracks and then tainted brown when it starts to melt. This place was untouched. Absent of trees meadows became features white lakes. The build up of snow made absorbs a substantial amount of noise. With most of the wild life hibernating or migrating the forest becomes almost eerily quiet.

After a couple of swigs of beer, and a couple of thrown snowballs I set off with my pinholga. Freshly loaded with Fuji Across I walked back 20 yards to a band in the river. The snow was deep enough to swallow my gorilla pod. I composed as best as I could with no viewfinder only a couple of sight lines and the spirit level on the Holga. It was so bright the exposure was only a couple of seconds. Picked up my camera and my beer off to another stop on the way back home.

On the way back I finished this roll of film. With negatives 6x12 you only get 6 exposures. Still new to working with any kind of Holga I didn’t have a proper spool tensioning strategy. Or even realize to check to tighten the roll when removing it from the camera. The loosely wound roll caused light leaks in 4 of the 6 images. Thankfully this one came out unharmed.

Last month I submitted this image to the Plates to Pixels call of art. The show titled “LenZless” is about making images with cameras that don’t have lenses. Some of the images selected they went beyond the pinhole camera, and made some very unique and interesting images. This image “Snowy River Bend” was chosen for the exhibit hosted on Plates to Pixels website and in the exhibits printed catalog. You can check out my image and all the others at the link below.

Plates to Pixels: LenZless

Thank you to Zeb Andrews, Blue Mitchell, and Plates to Pixels.